Goumi Again

I’ve written a number of times about my attempts to propagate goumi from cuttings that did not overwinter to a seedling that turned out not to be goumi.  Last year I ordered two goumi plants from a Canadian supplier but their supplier did not ship them so that order was cancelled.

This year I place the order again and it was filled with two extremely healthy plants that actually had fruit on them.  I got to taste the fruit and can say that the quest has been well worth it.  Goumi is a sweet, juicy treat.

I decided to have another go at propagating goumi so that I could get them on their own roots in case the graft failed.  I took 10 semi-hardwood cuttings on August 3, dipped them in Stim-Root 10000, and stuck them in an intermittent misting bed where they got 10 seconds of mist every 10 minutes from 7 am to 7 pm.

Slowly the cuttings deteriorated as the leaves yellowed and dropped off – probably a sign of too much water.  I’ve since then increased the perlite:peat ratio up to between 3:1 and 4:1.

One cutting pushed out a new leaf and showed resistance when I tugged gently at the cutting which suggested that roots had formed.  So I gently pried in loose from the rooting medium with a fork and looked at the tiny roots.  I potted in up in a perlite/peat mix gave it a watering with a transplant liquid fertilizer.  Then I put it a sheltered spot out of direct sun.  It failed to put out any more leaves and died.

But today when I looked at the remaining cuttings, two looked promising.  One had put out a new leaf and the other had managed to keep one leaf.  So once again, I carefully pried the cuttings out of the rooting material and found that each had roots started.

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They were potted up in a porous perlite/peat mixture and the roots were dusted with mycorrhizal fungi.  They were then watered with a root stimulant fertilizer that contains Kinetin.

 

Perhaps this time will be the one where I get more goumi plants.

 

Pictures here.

 

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