What would Sir Alec Guiness say?

Over the past couple of years, we’ve been cutting paths through our seven acres of woods. This, in part, is to allow us access to the wild apple trees that are there and, in part, to allow us access so that we can add edible native species such as wild black currants, black raspberries, and elderberries, nodding onions, ostrich ferns, etc. One of the paths crosses a low area that during the spring gets very wet with the spring runoff to the point that you can’t walk across it without rubber boots and even then the suction of the mud is enough to pull your boots off.  So we decided to make a marsh boardwalk although not as fancy.  We had some old cedar fence posts that we had pulled up when we built the house.  They were about 9-10′ long and would just span the 20′ low area.  Sitting on damp soil wouldn’t do them much more damage that the years spent in the ground.  So Joyce’s brother Stephen came from Toronto to give me a hand moving the posts down into the woods and muscling them into place, we roughly levelled them and

used two shorter lengths to splice the long lengths together using some 10″ spikes that I had left over from another job.

Then we started attaching 8′ pressure treated deck boards that had been cut in half to 4′.  Every once in a while I had to saw off the remains of a branch so that the board would sit properly.   The work went very smoothly and by lunch time we were 1/3 done.  It was the perfect break point because we were out of boards and screws and the drill batteries needed to be recharged.

Picking up after lunch, we got more boards and screws from the local lumber yard and quickly finished.  We added a bit of soil at both ends to create a bit of a ramp and tossed some grass seed on it.

It’s not the River Kwai and Alec Guiness, with his British reserve, might not have laughed or, at least, not outright but as with the River Kwai bridge it serves its purpose very well.

More pictures.

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